Photography

Name:  Martin Bloomfield What do you do at Seaside Creative? Make tea and be annoying?  Ok, I head up the visual content side of the team.  Having had many years in photography and, more recently, video production I still enjoy getting a buzz out of taking a photo or shooting a video.  I also get to work with a bunch of associates who have complementary skills, like drone photography, corporate video production, sound engineers etc.  I also manage and develop websites, working again with some very clever techy people for the more advanced sites our clients have asked for. Have you always worked in this type of business?  If not, what else have you done?  No, prior to setting up Seaside Creative with Kelly, I had my own business Bloomfield Digital, offering mainly photography and video.  In 2014 we became Google Certified Street View Photographers producing quality 360 degree virtual tours of business premises across the South East of England.  We started to do websites as clients liked the convenience and support we gave, along with running social media accounts.  Our expertise in visual content certainly does help with creating content. In 2016 Bloomfield Digital won the Adur and Worthing Small Business Award which just blew me away.  We faced a lot of competition with over 14 other businesses, some of which were quite established.  This gave me a massive boost of confidence to leave my home office and move into a shared studio space on Lancing Business Park.  Prior to Bloomfield Digital I worked for a short while at the Home Office as a specialist advisor for forensic science quality standards. I worked with Police Forces across the UK to gain UKCAS accreditation.  In 2012 I was made redundant from Sussex Police when the Scientific Support Branch merged with Surrey Police’s branch.  I had worked my way up to being Head of Imaging and Crime Lab at Sussex.  I worked with 16 very skilled and talented people using the latest forensic techniques from Lasers, Quasers, alternative light sources, to using cyanoacrylate (superglue to you and me), DFO, Vacuum Metal Deposition (VMD) using gold and zinc, Ninhydrin etc, for finding fingerprints and other forensic evidence on all types of surfaces that might have been handled by suspects and offenders of crime.  We used liquid latex to remove soot from fire scenes (to see if there was any types of evidence on the walls beneath) to using liquid nitrogen to freeze split number plates again for fingerprint evidence.  I had the best trained and equipped lab in the South East of England.    Do you have any workplace rituals? When I started my career with Sussex Police (1987) I was a photographic technician. In those days we had to handle some pretty smelly and dangerous chemicals to develop films and process photo paper. So every day the photographic team of eight would take a break at 10am and 3pm for coffee and tea.  Coffee in the morning and tea in the afternoon, quite often with a biscuit or cake.  Still can’t get out of the habit…  Tell us an interesting but little known fact about you.  I feature in two of the Peter James Roy Grace novels.  Peter came to visit the team and I showed him around the lab facilities and a few of the techniques we used for detecting fingerprints and other forensic evidence.  The VMD technique is good on surfaces that may have been wet and Peter subsequently used this in a story line of a submerged outboard motor.  First I was Mike Bloomfield and then in the second book I was Martin Bloomfield.   Where do you see yourself in five years time?  Good question!  I find my aspirations change on a yearly basis. A week before Covid hit the UK we were just about to put our house on the market; we had chosen and spoken to the estate agents about a live date.  This has now been shelved for at least a year to see how the market pans out.  I must admit I don’t plan that far ahead in life, I take life a year at a time.  It would be great to see Seaside Creative thrive and grow.  Have you read anything good recently, whether for fun, work or both?   I do have a stack of books on my bedside cabinet.  Currently there are four: The Miracle Morning by Hal Elrod, recommended by Gillian Fielding (Secret Millionaire and patron of the Worthing and Adur Chamber of Commerce)  Six habits that will transform your life before 8am. In fact my copy appeared courtesy of my youngest son, who’d bought it for his own development.   I’m definitely not an early riser, so this will be quite a challenge!         Make the most of your time on Earth  Rough Guide 1000 Ultimate Travel Experiences.  I always enjoy a good travel guide.  I have the whole collection of Michael Palin travels. This is one of those to dip and out of.       Brain Rules for Aging Well by John Medina - my wife Alison bought this for me at Christmas… no comment...

Having a lot of knowledge in our field is great for us, but it feels even better to share that knowledge. This is exactly what we’ve been doing recently, working with both Worthing and Adur Chamber of Commerce as well as businesses to run training sessions. Worthing and Adur Chamber of Commerce offers training sessions led by local experts called ‘WiseUp2’ sessions. Both of our Directors have offered up their own expertise on many occasions through running their own WiseUp2 sessions. In fact, Kelly has one coming up soon!  Seaside Creative offers a complete service to its clients, so whether you need help with writing, websites, digital marketing or photography and video, our team have the expertise. Which is why the sessions that we run for the Chamber are so diverse. The approach we take with our training sessions is often hands on, we love to get the people attending interacting and trying out the skills they are learning right there and then.  Recently, our Director Martin Bloomfield took along a selection of his recording equipment to a WiseUp2 training session he was running on how to use smartphones to create video for social media. Having the equipment there allowed people to try it out for themselves. By the end of the session everyone had the opportunity to get a hands on learning experience.  Within the last week, Kelly and Alison have been delivering training sessions to a local organisation that wanted to train its staff in social media marketing. This was a great opportunity for Alison, our digital marketing assistant, to share her expert Instagram knowledge and get to grips with running a training session.  Even though we love to share our knowledge, we also need to brush up on our own skills from time to time. At Seaside Creative, we often attend training sessions ourselves and become students again! We never shy away from learning a new skill, or brushing up on a current one - #NeverStopLearning! If you’re looking for training across any marketing sphere of expertise, we can most likely cover it. Our sessions are delivered bespoke to clients’ needs. What’s your marketing pain point? Let us help get rid of it. Contact us today. If you're not quite ready for training or other help just yet you can sign up to our email newsletter so you'll get all our help and advice delivered monthly. ...

We have been taking pictures and filming all over the place this month. We have been in fields, at schools, in rooms full of people and even inside metal containers - yep we get all the glamorous locations! It doesn't matter where we are or what we take pictures of, there are some factors that we always consider and we thought you'd like to know some of them: Think about your framing.  Landscape (or view), Portrait (or upright) or now, if you're an Instagramer, square. We see so many people using their smartphone camera in the upright mode in situations landscape would work better. Upright photography Or does the landscape work better? Think about photo bombers Taking group photos can throw up a lot of small issues, most of which can be rectified before the image is taken. However; photo bombing is one that gets noticed in the post production stage.   Innocent group photo Or is it? Think about the exposure   OK, most smartphones have an auto exposure mode, which means users don't get much of a chance to alter the settings. What's important in this photograph, the corridor? or the light through the window? Try taping the screen to the area in the frame that matters most.   The dark area or the light area and the camera will usually readjust the exposure to where you have just touched.  With newer smartphones, there is a setting known as HDR - High Dynamic Range where the camera will try to blend the high lights (white areas) and low lights (the dark areas) to create a more even exposure. The cloister corridor leading from the dining room to the school building of Lancing College.   Think about how the image will be cropped, if at all Cropping the images can be a good idea to create impact and cut the clutter from an image. Going back to the first photograph and editing the image to square can be good.  There are loads of apps to use if your smartphone doesn't do what you want it to do with the photo.  One particular favourite of ours is SnapSeed (now taken over by Google and is available for both Android and iPhone).  This enables users to enhance photos and apply digital filters.   Think about if text will be over the image Text over the image is a popular for business -  it's gets the message across very quickly.  Snapseed has a good range of text overlays otherwise another useful app for this is Over  - Fast and effective with some simple templates to use.   If you want help with your photography and post capture work, we regularly run training courses in conjunction with the Worthing and Adur Chamber of Commerce. Check out what's coming up soon on their website. We'll also include details in our monthly newsletter which you can sign up for here. Alternatively, you can contact us to see how we can help you today....